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The Hall of Mirrors was constructed by Jules Hardouin-Mansart in 1678 and its vaulted ceiling was painted by Charles Le Brun between 1681 and 1684.
© Thomas Garnier

Hall of Mirrors

The Hall of Mirrors, the most famous room in the Palace, was built to replace a large terrace designed by the architect Louis Le Vau, which opened onto the garden. Le Vau’s successor, Jules Hardouin-Mansart, produced a more suitable design that replaced the terrace with a large gallery, beginning in 1678 and completed in 1684.

Following on from the victory over the three united powers, depicted in the War Room, the whole length of the Hall of Mirrors (73m) pays tribute to the political, economic and artistic success of France. Political successes are illustrated through the 30 painted compositions on the vaulted ceiling by Le Brun, which depict the glorious history of Louis XIV during the first 18 years of his reign, from 1661 to the peace treaties of Nijmegen. Military and diplomatic victories and reforms with a view to reorganising the kingdom are illustrated through allegories from Antiquity.

Economic prosperity is revealed in the number and size of the 357 mirrors bedecking the 17 arches opposite the windows, demonstrating that the new French manufacture could rival the Venetian monopoly on mirror manufacturing. At the time such items were a great luxury. Artistic success is shown by the Rouge de Rance pilasters topped with capitals of gilded bronze based on a new design, which was referred to as “the French style” and was created by Le Brun upon the request of Colbert. The design incorporates the national emblems, with a fleur-de-lis topped by a royal sun between two Gallic roosters (the Latin word for rooster was gallus).

Courtiers and visitors crossed the Hall of Mirrors daily, and it also served as a place for waiting and meeting. It was used for ceremonies on rare occasions, for example when sovereigns wanted an extra dash of lavishness for entertainment (balls or games) held for royal weddings or diplomatic receptions. It was also here that the Treaty of Versailles was signed on 28 June 1919, ending the First World War. Since then, presidents of the Republic have continued to receive official guests here.

Many World Heritage sites are temporarily closed to prevent the spread of COVID-19. Please check official websites for more information.

Visit

Hall of Mirrors

Hours

*Low season: *
From 1 November to 31 March, the Palace is open every day except on Mondays, 25 December and 1 January.
Opening times: 12:00 – 17:30

Last admission: 17:00
Ticket office closes at 16:50


*High season: *
From 1 April to 31 October, the Palace is open every day except on Mondays and 1 May.
Opening times: 9:00 – 18:30
Last admission: 18:00
Ticket office closes at 17:50

Pricing

The Passport cost 27 euros and includes the admission to the whole Estate: the Palace (with audio guide), the estate of Trianon, the temporary exhibitions, the Gardens and the Park, the Musical Fountains Show and the Coach Gallery. Other tickets are available.