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Potsdam was a sanctuary for Frederick the Great, who wanted to escape bustling Berlin.
© L. Seidel / SPSG

Sanssouci Palace

No other palace is so closely linked with the personality of Frederick the Great as Sanssouci Palace. The king’s summer residence was ultimately his favorite place and sanctuary in difficult times.

Frederick the Great wanted to cultivate plums, figs, and wine on Potsdam’s doorstep. In 1744, he had a terraced garden designed in Sanssouci Park for this reason. But, due to the exceptionally beautiful view, he conceived of a summer residence above the terraces just a year later. The New Palace and picture gallery were constructed in subsequent years, while the slopes of the grounds were used as flower and vegetable gardens.

In contrast with the playful design of the garden façade, the north façade is majestic and commanding. A double row of eighty-eight Corinthian columns forms two colonnades in quarter-circle segments enclosing a semicircular cour d'honneur. The Ruins Hill is aligned with this axis to the north.  - © A. Stiebitz / SPSG
In contrast with the playful design of the garden façade, the north façade is majestic and commanding. A double row of eighty-eight Corinthian columns forms two colonnades in quarter-circle segments enclosing a semicircular cour d'honneur. The Ruins Hill is aligned with this axis to the north. - © A. Stiebitz / SPSG

Today, you will find Frederick II’s tomb on the palace hill. On the pile of ruins to the north of the palace, artificial ruins from the ancient world concealed a water basin. The king was most attached to the lavish waterworks, which only worked properly after the construction of the steam engine building in the 19th century.

The Baroque garden, which had gone out of fashion in the meantime, was redesigned in the style of a landscape park under Frederick the Great’s successors and was expanded by Frederick William IV by structures such as Charlottenhof Palace, the Orangery, and the Roman Baths. They were meant to bring part of Italy to his native country. Today, Sanssouci Park provides a breathtaking backdrop for events such as the Potsdam Court concerts and musical festivals.

“I have chosen the plans of the most beautiful
of what has been built in Europe, above all in Italy.
I have been able to have them executed
with small funds of my own.”

-Frederick II to de Catt, his reader, 1758

Visit

Sanssouci Palace

Hours

January - March:
Monday: closed
Tuesday - Sunday: 10:00 - 16:30

April - October:
Monday: closed
Tuesday - Sunday: 10:00 - 17:30

November - December:
Monday: closed
Tuesday - Sunday: 10:00 - 16:30

On public holidays, weekend opening hours apply unless otherwise stated.
Last admission: 30 minutes before closing

Pricing

Visits to Sanssouci Palace are bound to fixed admission times. Same-day tickets are available for purchase at palace registers as of 10 am. Because the number of admission tickets per day is limited, we recommend purchasing your tickets in advance through the SPSG online ticket shop.

sanssouci+ Ticket
Price: € 19.00 Reduced: € 14.00
Buy tickets online

sanssouci+ Family Ticket
Price: € 49.00

Annual Pass for the Palaces
Price: € 60.00 Reduced: € 40.00

Photo Permit for the Palaces
Valid for one day for all palaces.
Only for private use. Not for publication.
No flash, no tripods.
Price: € 3.00

Contact Information

SPSG | Visitor's Information