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The Lion Fountain was moved to the Palace Garden in the 1740's and was only returned back to its original place in the Flower Garden after World War II.
© Tomas Vrtal

The Flower Garden

The Flower Garden of Kroměříž, also known as the Pleasure Garden or Lustgarten, represents a transition between late renaissance Italian gardens and classical baroque gardens of the French type, such as the one in Versailles, and may be the only example of this transition in Europe.

The Flower Garden was built in the second half of the 17th century by Bishop of Olomouc Karl II von Liechtenstein-Castelcorno (1664-1695). The bishop had a very clear idea on what the garden should look like, having drawn inspiration from secluded Renaissance palace gardens in France, Italy, Germany, and the Netherlands.

The first phase of the construction, representing the main part of the garden, took place between 1665 and 1675. The second phase was implemented in the 1680’s. The initial works were directed by an Italian architect Filiberto Luchese (1607–1666) and after his death, by his younger colleague and collaborator Giovanni Pietro Tencalla (1629–1702).

Aerial view of the Flower Garden and Rotunda – © UNESCO World Heritage Centre
Aerial view of the Flower Garden and Rotunda – © UNESCO World Heritage Centre

The central part of the Flower Garden, in the form of a long rectangle with geometrically shaped topiary, consists of two parts – a floral garden and an orchard. The main axis of the garden, beginning with the entry through sculptural loggia, is accented by numerous architectural and art features, including ornamental borders, Lion and Triton fountains, Rotunda, labyrinths, fishponds, skittle alley, and so-called Strawberry Hills. This formal structure is organically complemented by adjacent ornamental and production areas, including the Orange Garden, Dutch Garden, greenhouses, farmyard, Pheasantry, Rabbit Hill and Aviary.

The Dutch Garden with Neptune's Fountain in its centre was a design masterpiece. It is situated in the southern part of the garden and was originally used for growing rare flowering bulbs. – © Tomas Vrtal
The Dutch Garden with Neptune's Fountain in its centre was a design masterpiece. It is situated in the southern part of the garden and was originally used for growing rare flowering bulbs. – © Tomas Vrtal

In its original 17th century form, the Flower Garden represents a breakthrough phase of European garden art. On one hand it still draws from the tradition of late renaissance gardens in Italy and Germany, while on the other hand it strives to encompass new spatial concepts of the budding French baroque Classicism. Taking the best from this double inspiration the Flower Garden is exceptional in Europe and globally.

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The Flower Garden

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